Bike Parts

Bike Parts

Just how bike-savvy are you? Can you name and describe the different parts of your beloved two-wheeled form of transport? You can probably point out the handlebars, the saddle and the pedals, for instance, but do you know what a Groupset or Derailleur is?
Let’s take a look at the key aspects of the bicycle.
Frame
The bike frame is essentially the main structure of any bike. They come in a variety of different sizes and shapes and sizes for a plethora of bike types, including road, mountain and cyclocross bicycles.
Handlebars
Handlebars, as you may have guessed, are used to steer a bike. Different bike types feature different kinds of handlebars: commuter bikes have upright handlebars to held the rider have a better view of what’s ahead; road bikes have narrow drop bars to give the rider improved aerodynamic positioning when descending; and mountain bikes feature wide riser handlebars to increase control in tight areas.
Stem
The stem attaches the handlebars to the rest of the bike. They are usually adjustable, allowing the rider to find the best possible position on the bike. Shorter stems provide quicker, responsive steering with poorer aerodynamics; longer stems stretch the rider out for increase aerodynamics and speed.
Saddles
A comfortable saddle is vital for every cyclist, whether it’s a wide, narrow, short, long, standard, or cut out. Riders seeking to move their legs quickly will require a narrow saddle, while a wider, curved saddle is more appropriate for riders in a more upright position.
Seat Posts
Seat posts attach the saddle to the bike frame. They can be adjusted up and down to suit the rider’s preference, whether they’re after better aerodynamics or improved control.
Pedals
Pedals are crucial in giving the rider proper control and power while cycling. They come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes to match the requirement of every cyclist.
Brakes
Bike brakes give riders the ability to reduce their speed or stop altogether. They come in four main types: V-Brakes and Cantilever (for commuters and mountain bikers), and Calliper and Disk brakes (used for road and mountain bikes respectively).
Crank Arms
Cranks Arms turn when the rider pedals, and they in turn rotate the chainrings. Modern chainrings are generally made from aluminium or carbon to decrease the overall weight of the bike.
Groupset
The groupset brings together a combination of different functions, including the brake and gear shifters, front and rear brakes, front and rear derailleurs, chainset, chain and rear cassette.
Chainset
The chainset of a bike is made up of the cranks, bottom bracket and chainring. Combined, this trio are crucial to the functioning of the drive chain, which moves the bike forward.
Rear Cassette
The rear cassette contains the range of gears that a bike has. Sprockets in the rear cassette determine how much pedal power is required – larger sprockets equate to easier gears and smaller sprockets provide more difficult gears.
Wheelset
A wheelset is, essentially, the pair of wheels your bike has. Bike wheels are made from steel, stainless steel, aluminium, titanium or carbon, or a combination of several.
Chainring
Road bike chainrings come in a variety of types, including compact, standard and triple chainrings. Riders can choose from triple, double and single chainrings, depending on their requirements while cycling.
Bottom Bracket
The bottom bracket of the bike is an axle connected to the crank arms, with bearings allowing them to turn. Modern bikes usually feature external bottom brackets rather than old cartridge style brackets.
Derailleurs
Derailleurs help cyclists change gear while riding. They work by carefully moving the chain from one chainring to the next. In terms of the rear cassette, derailleurs move gears up and down the sprockets – more than one front chainring will require another derailleur to move the chain between these, too.
Forks
The bike fork holds the front wheel of the bike in place. It reaches from the headset of the bike to the hub of the wheel . They are normally composed of two stanchions connected at the crown. The steerer section allows the rider to turn the wheels and, consequently, the bike itself.
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